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9 Days - In the Wake of the Spanish Armadas [Oranjestad to Colón]

 
 
9 Days - In the Wake of the Spanish Armadas [Oranjestad to Colón]
Starting from $2,199*

Oranjestad to Colón


Ship: Wind Surf


Departure Date :

Feb 05 2022

Optional tours are available from most ports for an additional charge.

 

Itinerary

 
Day Oranjestad, Aruba
Departs 06:00 PM
"Located off the coast of Venezuela, the windswept Dutch island of Aruba is otherworldly. Here, the beaches are spectacularly pristine, the waters are romantically restless, the island interior is lunar-like and filled with cacti, and the trees arequite famouslybent in the wind. The island's consistent trade winds are part of the destination's allure: They keep the humidity, rain and hurricanes common in much of the Caribbean during its off-season at bay. The main port and capital city, Oranjestad, is a maze of Dutch-colonial architecture painted in a palette of Caribbean pastels. There are some historic sites of note and myriad shops, from boutiques to megastores, selling all sorts of keepsakes, with jewelry and gold being popular itemsin fact, gold was mined here in the 19th century. In Oranjestad and along the beaches you'll also find a treasure trove of excellent seafood restaurants, while farther afield are lighthouses, gold mine ruins and natural wonders that reflect the rugged appeal of Aruba. "
Oranjestad, Aruba
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Santa Marta, Colombia
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
Romantic Santa Marta has it all: history (Colombias oldest city), natural beauty (from gentle bays and beaches to the highest coastal mountain range in the world), and its very own celebrity. Simon Bolivar (The Liberator) is known as the George Washington of South America, and this was his Mount Vernon. Visit his beautiful estate or head to one of the two UNESCO Biosphere Reserves nearby.
Santa Marta, Colombia
 
 
Day Cartagena, Colombia
Arrives 08:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
The Spanish founded Cartagena, officially known as Cartagena de Indias, in 1533. The city rapidly became a thriving commercial port, where precious stones and minerals from the New World awaited shipment back to Spain. Situated in a bay on the Caribbean Sea, Cartagena had the most extensive fortifications in South America, once guarded by 29 stone forts and a high wall of coral-stone measuring 16-miles long, 40-feet high and 50-feet wide. Completed in 1657, the Castle of San Felipe de Barajas is said to be the most grandiose work of military architecture erected by Spain in the Americas. Today, Cartagena's riches are found in the Boca Grande, an area of the city with beautiful waterfront hotels, trendy restaurants, casinos and boutiques.
Cartagena, Colombia
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day San Blas Islands, Panama
Arrives 07:00 AM Departs 03:00 PM
An archipelago of 365 palm-fringed isles surrounded by coral reefs, the San Blas Islands (known to locals as Guna Yala, its official name since 2011, or by its former name of Kuna Yala) lie off Panama’s northeast Caribbean coast. Fewer than 50 of the islands are inhabited, and on ones close to the mainland, residents live in thatched bamboo houses and get around by dugout canoes. Some outer islands are coconut plantations with a lone caretaker as the sole resident. An autonomous province of Panama since 1924, with its own constitution approved in 1945, the San Blas Islands are governed by the Kuna Indians, whose ancestors arrived in the early 19th century from the mainland along the Colombian–Panamanian border. The men farm bananas, plantains and coconuts, while the women, colorfully dressed and adorned with nose rings, metal bracelets and beads wrapped around their ankles and wrists, sell their handiwork to tourists—beautiful reverse appliqué cloth panels known as molas. Here, you can experience a genuine slice of Central American culture from an indigenous people who are staunch protectors of their traditions and environment.
San Blas Islands, Panama
 
 
Day Bocas del Toro, Panama
Arrives 01:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
Bocas Town was established on Colon Island in this archipelago by the United Fruit Company in the 1920s as a base for its banana plantations. The picturesque period charm of the town is today exploited by the locals to attract tourists. All of the islands have lovely beaches, mangrove waterways to explore and even several different indigenous populations who make and sell colorful handicrafts. A plentiful variety of wildlife including many species of birds, animals and sea turtles adds to the areas appeal. Panama shares the nearby Parque Internacional La Amistad (Friendship), a UNESCO World Heritage Site, with Costa Rica.
Bocas del Toro, Panama
 
 
Day Puerto Limón/Moin, Costa Rica
Arrives 06:00 AM Departs 06:00 PM
As the most important port of Costa Rica, Puerto Limon has a long history dating back to when Columbus landed here in 1502. Used initially for exporting bananas and grains, Puerto Limon is now more famous for its cashews and its unique architecture. This area is well known also for it amazing national parks, pristine beaches and fun surf. Parque Vargas offers an impressive view over the Atlantic and Veragua Rainforest Park includes the largest indoor nocturnal frog exhibit.
Puerto Limón/Moin, Costa Rica
 
 
Day At Sea

 
 
Day Colon, Panama
Arrives 07:00 AM
The town was built as the Caribbean terminus of the Panama Railway and is adjacent to the Caribbean end of the Canal. A trip through the coastal rain forest to the old Spanish fortress of San Lorenzo gives great views of wildlife along the way and the seacoast at the end. Visitors often tour to the Miraflores or Gatun Locks of the canal from here. The Chagres National Park offers visits to the indigenous Embera people, and nearby Portobelo is a UNESCO World Heritage Site whose church holds an unusual statue of Christ depicted as a black man.
Colon, Panama